Updated: Santomean Bloggers — the Blogosphere Categorized

Sao Tome Architecture blog by Neco Bragança

This is a roundup of all the bloggers I’ve found that blog about Sao Tome & Principe. This is the full list including inactive blogs (noted). Most of the are in Portuguese (the ones dealing with the OLPC project are in English). If your blog is missing, get in touch with me, and I’ll see about adding you to the list.

People Blogging About São Tomé and Príncipe

OLPC Project

Blogs written about the OLPC Project in summer 2009 by Chika Umeadi, Michael Stein, Martin Wolske, and more recently by Beth Santos, have been the most active. These are the only English-language blogs about the islands apart from the scientist Robert Drewes and our own SaoTomeBlog.

Architecture

There’s a single blog about architecture, written by Neco Bragança (this is certainly an area which I’d like to read about more) – unfortunately inactive.

Development and Society

Blogs dealing with development and societal issues are the most numerous, including Kiluange TinyWilson BragançaBilaine Ceita, and Eduardo Galeano – all of these blogs haven’t been updated for a while.

Journalism

Henrique Vasconcellos, one of the Portuguese journalists working on the islands, blogs actively and uploads his reports on YouTube.

Science & Conservation

As São Tomé e Príncipe is so biodiverse, it has attracted a number of scientists to work there, including Brigida Rocha BritoRobert Drewes, Ricardo Lima, and Mariana Fruitdove. Finally, scientists from the Lisbon Oceanarium, Cláudia Delgado and Nuno Loreiro, write about the endangered tortoises and their efforts to protect the species.

Personal

Personal blogs that I’ve found include Camilla Sá FreireJota Taborda, and Arcadio da Silva

Art

While there are a number of artists on the islands only Kwame Sousa and the Teia D’Arte gallery have blogs, both which have not been updated for a while.

History and Tradition

Blogs written by Marta Gomes and André Freitas include articles of Santomean history and tradition.

Last updated March 26, 2010.